On Passover Readiness

 Posted by on April 3, 2012
Apr 032012
 

Are you ready for Passover?

 

A family is ready for Passover by being wrapped in all kinds of paper so as to be really really clean

Kosher for Passover

Frieda Vizel

Frieda Vizel left the Hasidic community, the Modern Orthodox community and the Formerly Orthodox (OTD) community. She now lives in Pomona and is actively looking for a new community to leave. She deals with the perplexities of people by cartooning them, a habit her therapist calls passive aggressive but she calls A Blogpost for Oy Vey Cartoons.

  12 Responses to “On Passover Readiness”

  1. I guess my family and I have never been ready for Passover since we never looked liked we were wrapped in mummy type swaddling clothes, or having just excaped from prison still wearing our striped prison clothes, or maybe just tied up by a home invasion crew. Wait! The Yidden DID excape from Mitzraim so maybe the prison outfits do fit the occasion…. Please pardon my ignorance but could you explain the picture or should I just ask four questions? And where is the mother of this fine family? In bed with a nervous breakdown?

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  2. I hope one day you merit to see the real beauty of pesach.

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  3. Martina!! This is not a depiction of reality, it’s a gross exageration! Of course no one wraps themselves in silver paper (I hope!), but the point is people go to crazy extremes. I remember when a friend’s brother was rushed to the hospital for pouring hot water down his throat in an attempt to “kasher” it.

    “And where is the mother of this fine family? In bed with a nervous breakdown?”
    Lol! Actually, she’s still on the drawing board scrubbing it clean to a spark!

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  4. Hey Mark, maybe worry about your own zicheesim and stop judging others’,

    Shpitzle, I’m sorry about not recognizing the aluminum foil! Now it all makes sense! And kudos for the paper booties around Tattie’s feet. After all, it’s Tattie who steps into the kitchen bread crumbs and tracks it all over the house. Whisper in Mommy’s ear: there’s no expletive deleted chumetz on drawing boards and if it sparkles, you won’t be able to see what you’re drawing!

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  5. martina, I am not judging. All I am saying is that I hope the auther of this cartoon will one day see the real and true beauty of pesach.

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  6. “I remember when a friend’s brother was rushed to the hospital for pouring hot water down his throat in an attempt to “kasher” it”

    Hey, you should’ve told it to deborah feldman. I am sure it would have made into the book.

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  7. Mark, why do you assume that the author of the cartoon hasn’t already seen the “real and true beauty” of Pesach? And you WERE judging; you were both judging and patronizing which is a good trick if one is so inclined to be tricky. Don’t try to deny it because it’s very obvious in your thirteen word sentence. Instead, try hoping that you, yourself, should one day merit to be a baal tshuva. See what I mean?

    Shaul, Deborah Feldman doesn’t need any help in fabricating stories about the Chasidic way of life. I doubt a true story would make it past her inner censure. I followed a link from this site to her interview with the NY Post. I’m not judging her, I’m judging the interview. The person responding to the questions seems to me to have some difficulty processing logical thoughts. But what do I know, I’m not a doctor.

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  8. Martina Patrick, you write “it’s very obvious in your thirteen word sentence”. Care to explain?

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  9. “Instead, try hoping that you, yourself, should one day merit to be a baal tshuva. See what I mean?” huh??????

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  10. Mark, if you can’t detect a statement that’s condescending, patronizing and judgemental (and a tiny bit sarcastic) then it would take more time and effort than I choose to bestow upon you to “explain.” As a matter of fact, I doubt if I could make any impact on your thought processes whatsoever. From these few words we’ve exchanged, I conclude that you have chosen to go through life with blinders on, looking neither to right nor left, and certain that only you know what is correct and true. If this makes you happy, then kol hakavod. I choose to be accepting of other people while keeping my own sense of self.

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  11. “looking neither to right nor left” whats wrong with looking to the right? its always good to be moisef in yidishkeit

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  12. Mark, may I duly note that you have now changed the subject completely. To answer your current post, actually it’s not always good to be moisef. We are warned to neither add to nor subtract from the Toirah. This relates to the above cartoon depicting a family who has added the chumra of covering themselves in aluminum foil as a precaution against–I don’t know what.

    Which reminds me of the ladies who take pains to squeeze their own orange and grapefruit juice while their husbands drink grape juice and/or wine made by Kedem. And the people who don’t use milchdigs on Pesach but the men put a little milk in the coffee in shul after davening. Unlike you, I make no judgement as to right or wrong. To each his own, live and let live, etc, these are the words I live by.

    And Mark, if you can’t construct a post at least six sentences long, I’m not going to bother answering you.

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